Calendar icon June 27, 2024

The secrets of Community Building and Organic Marketing in Property Management

Organic marketing is a powerful tool, but a difficult one to wield and be effective with. Building community through hosted events and an online presence is a great way to reach prospective investors that you may one day manage properties for.

 

Pablo Gonzalez has lots of experience doing exactly this, and he joins the show to break down how your company can leverage these disciplines as well. Listen as Andrew and Pablo covers real-life examples and the ins and outs of uses content and organic sources to grow your business.

 

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Questions or thoughts on the topics we covered? Email us at triplewin@secondnature.com 

 

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Season 4 Episode 12 features Pablo Gonzalez

The Triple Win Property Management podcast is produced and distributed by Second Nature

 

Transcript

 

Pablo Gonzalez
How do you create events where the people that are your biggest fans are there, and so are the people that are your prospects and they interact, right? And how can you make those events more about the biggest, you know, creating content about the biggest fans and the moments from the new people that are there more so than created content around, like check out this sweet party we just had.

Andrew Smallwood
Hello professional property managers, Andrew Smallwood here with Triple Win podcast. I'm joined by my friends, Pablo Gonzalez who was just keynote this morning live at NARPM Broker/Owner. So we're recording here live, at the end of a Triple-Winssday. Pablo, thanks for joining us.

Pablo Gonzalez
I'm just a very big Andrew Smallwood fan. I'm happy to be here.

Andrew Smallwood
We didn't even coordinate this this morning! But funny story, a side story. Yeah. So we got Pablo jacket, and Pablo actually got me a jacket, which was pretty cool. It was personalized, and custom made. So, anyway, it's been it's been fun to get to know you better and see the relationship from it.

Pablo Gonzalez
Likewise, man, I've seen what you and Second Nature does as a company and how you all show up and the way that you I mean, my keynote was about driving word of mouth. You guys do this jacket thing? This is a real word of mouth thing. This is why I wanted a jacket so I could prove it on stage and talk about you, man. So I'm a big fan for real.

Andrew Smallwood
Cool. Where I'd love to start, for our listeners, is, you know, give them some background, like who is Pablo Gonzalez? What do you do? And, you know, maybe you could include, you know, your role with JWB in that.

Pablo Gonzalez
Yeah, man, I've just been on this kick of trying to prove community creation as a future business development for like nine years. I don't say it's the future anymore because I think it's here. And, you know, started very simply. I was at my brother's funeral and 1200 people showed up to the church, and I looked around and and I thought about those 1200 people having been the the ones that really got us through the two toughest years of our life as we battled pancreatic cancer and were really propping up my family and like the hardest moment of our life and saw them and thought, man, you know, I know that I've been a a questioner of my faith since I'm about a teenager, but these people here are my community, and this community is the greatest value I could imagine. If they could prop us up like this. And I could never leave this because of the value it provides, regardless of what I feel about my faith or whatever. And they say that in moments of greatest pain come the greatest clarity. And it just hit me like a lightning strike that I'm like, oh, that's just self return. You know, this is no different than me being a client. I wasn't sure if I wanted to renew and, I decided I'm going to renew and I'm going to renew forever because of this community. And that identification of it, solving a business case. And then my reticular activator hitting and starting to recognize that if I buy a Harley Davidson, I can’t go get a Honda motorcycle two years later because I'm going to lose all my friends and that other, you know, companies are really doing this stuff set me on the path of like, man, how does the average company do this thing? And I've just been iterating forward from doing it at nonprofits to doing it to do business development for the construction company and to work forward to doing it for a startup to eventually late 2019 JWB real estate companies came to me with a really attractive problem. Their problem was that most of their new business came from a very expensive lead source or real estate education program. That was like handing them people that were already educated and super high value, but they were really paying high for it and they saw that as a risk, right? Like them not controlling their lead sources. And juxtapose that to the idea that they're this like really impressive company that gets all this press had just been on the front page of the Wall Street Journal, and they couldn't close internet leads because they just didn't have that figured out. And Greg Cohen, who is one of the founders there and has become one of my best friends, is, he said, they're saying, man, if people just spent some time with us, right? Like, if people got to know us a little bit better, people that know the people that we know, they do business with us. But I just can't figure out how to do that. And he tried to go the route of like filming himself doing stuff. He had ideas of like nine holes, nine lessons, and like doing golf lessons while filming content and all this, like, high stuff, but like, it really wasn't working. He hated doing it, and he was in so much pain that he decided to listen to somebody with the crazy idea of basically saying, listen, man, I think that you're doing it wrong. Like I think you're if you think about your clients, they're a bunch of really interesting people. Real estate investors all have great stories. And if you can highlight a little bit of of who they are and use that in your content and highlight a little bit about, you know, why they're investing in Jacksonville unlike what the city has to offer. Alongside highlighting his team and his business and himself, who I think is a phenomenal dude that's going to work for you much better than you just going out there and trying to, like, teach the world and like torture yourself, trying to do this thing and the way that we can do this in a way that makes it easy for you to just show up and do it, is we launched this internet talk show where we have these conversations with these folks, and we repurpose and put it on social media, put it on a podcast and put it on YouTube. By the end of year one, it created a $40 million client acquisition channel and that, you know, really decided he wanted to do business for me for a long time. And, and was really, really interesting is that, you know, this thing did launch a community, had people showing up over and over again. and we built this like 3000 person Facebook group. But when we looked back in 2021, we realized that 80% of those 40 million bucks came from 30 people. There was 30 people that bought more properties, 30 people that referred their friends, 30 people that when somebody would show up to the zoom call and they were like, I don't get it. They just give me a call, don't worry about it. You know, like and and help validate things. So it was very clear that what we had was not just a community, but like a word of mouth strategy for convincing clients that, you know, we are the people that do business with, like showing them why it makes sense to buy turnkey properties and invest in Jacksonville, you know, really also gave the opportunity to like show how special of a company they really are.

Andrew Smallwood
So Pablo, I love the personal story that you shared and the the impact it's obviously had on JWB and a different approach of how they go to the market to generate customers who they're focused on, how they're engaging them in a way that makes real business sense. Something I felt like kind of underpinned a lot of what you're talking about as a baby entrepreneur. You know, I'd love to hear your perspective on this is really an important aspect of communities. There's a strong sense of belonging. Yeah. like when you say, hey, I would buy this motorcycle with this motorcycle because it goes two miles faster or where, but there's a sense of belonging associated with that. Yeah. Working with this company, Biden's product, whatever it might be. Is that the essence of community? How do you think about it?

Pablo Gonzalez
Yeah, I mean, the essence of community is, is belonging. And, the way that I like to think of it is, you know, to be inclusionary, you also have to be exclusionary, right. And like, you have to tell people just as much who they're not and then who they are for people to really consolidate around it. And then what community becomes is essentially an exercise in recognizing the value of the people around you and recognizing who else can use that value, and making sure that that value exchange happens in some way. And for me, every community that I've seen that really works, including the church, it revolves around the stage because you get leverage when you have a stage to recognize the value, right. So you can have an expert talking from there, or you can have a community member talking from there. And if you realize that someone in your community is good at a certain thing, that can serve the rest of them, and you bring them up to that stage as well. So in a sense, it's a game of status recognition and, and, and doling out status, but made to serve as you being able to share your value with others and gain value from others in as easy a way as possible. And if you can make that happen, then people recognize that I'm here for something good. There's something really in it for me.

Andrew Smallwood
How much of this since the belonging would you say comes from, and what really binds the community to make it work, & how much of it comes from like, I believe what you believe? You believe what I believe and how much of it comes from ‘I've got a sense of who I'm trying to become’, and actually being around this group of people, it's like helping me towards that transformational goal? How do you think about that?

Pablo Gonzalez
I'm going to say the caveat that community can mean a lot of different things, right? For the exercise that we're talking about, we're talking about businesses building community in order to like create value for the business as well. Right? Because there can definitely be a community around dudes who love to snowboard. Right? When it comes to the business, I think what you said is spot on. People will unite around a problem that they all believe in, that they all really, really want to solve. And if you can point a vision towards, you know what this problem is and how it feels and and provide ideas around how to solve this thing that people can get behind, then people will enroll in solving it. And it's not just about showing up as you are the problem solver, it is about enlisting people on a mission, right? Enlisting people in this idea that we can all figure out how to have a better retirement right? That we're not, we call the show ‘the not your average investor show”. You know, like we're not people that think that just investing in our 401K is going to get us or we're not average, we're going to look at other things and we're going to decide what's best for us. And if you can make an intersection between what this mission is, the problem that you solve that helps them get to this attractive state and then paint with this attractive future state becomes people really tend to coalesce behind that and want to be a part of this.

Andrew Smallwood
I'd love to keep like mapping some of this to the JWB example and the not your average investor. So, you know, if you were to say, hey, there's an identity that I embrace, right? So, what what would that be for the community that ‘hey, I'm not your average investor?’

Pablo Gonzalez
I'm not average. Not like I do not see the world through the lens of what everybody else sees. I'm out here trying to find control my own path to retirement and wealth, not just be given the things that everybody just believes I should be doing. And that fits in well with rental property investing because as you know, when you go to buy a rental property, many people are going to come out of the woodwork talking about how that doesn't really work and how they did it, and they got screwed by some reason or another. And at the end of the day, did the cash flow really matter? Did I not pay it all back in taxes, you know, like those kinds of things. So like this idea of giving people a safe space of just like, yeah, you're right, you have to think different to do this thing. You have to be courageous. And you got to understand that when you win, it's not waiting to buy real estate, but you buy real estate and wait, right. Like, we get it. Other people don't, you know? So really going hard at that, that ideology definitely helps. Like you, you definitely hear people in our community rallying around this like we're not average, right? Like it's a it's a thing that they say. It's a thing that they really, really believe in is the thing that we fight for as much as possible.

Andrew Smallwood
Yeah, I get a rallying cry I like. Yeah, yeah. So a question is like what? I want to think about how I want to ask this, for JWB if you're defining like their customer profile, they're not trying to work with every rental property owner right in the US, you know, it's like, how do you describe here's a customer we've decided to serve. Yeah. How that connects to is that the exact same profile as the not your average investor community? Is that a perfect venn-diagram. Is it different? How do you guys think about that?

Pablo Gonzalez
When I walked into JWB, they were doing a lot of content that served the real estate investor. The active real estate investor that they thought if somebody is active in real estate, they're going to do a flip and then they're going to want to park that money with us. And when we actually looked at their clientele, there was some of that. But there was also a large amount of people that were just W-2 workers that wanted to invest in real estate and did not want to be real estate investors. They just wanted to invest. They did not want to have to stay up with it. And in that regard, you know, we leaned hard at that. We felt like that was the low hanging fruit for them. because, the real estate investor will tend to like, oh, at the end of the day, their ideal client is somebody that wants to be as passive as possible. Right. Like they want they have their systems in place. They have this like data flywheel. They do things the way that they know because they have their own proprietary data because of the market penetration that they have in Jacksonville and specific neighborhoods, they have like really widget-ized what a rental property is by the numbers. So, you know, they're going to do some things that the average real estate investor is going to be like, wait a minute, I'm supposed to do that? And they're like, no, our data says this, and we don't even want to bother with this conversation. All right. So I don't know that answered the question, but this idea of like you, we didn't want to call it the Rental property Investor show. We didn't want to call it the real estate Wealth show. We wanted to just like, delineate from real estate all together and make a space for people that want to be in real estate, but don't necessarily have to consider themselves real estate investors, because at the end of the day, they want to be the real estate investors. They are the expert that is doing this thing for you and, the more you get in the way, the more painful it becomes for everybody.

Andrew Smallwood
Yeah. So it almost feels like the community strategy is a little more at the top of the funnel. And like, actually, here's what I mean by that: it just is as opposed to, okay, here are people that are fully educated and I've decided to invest in real estate, and I want to do it in a passive way as an owner. So they're getting that right through content education all the way through, but who the community is targeted attracting is really people who want to invest, again, not your average investor. Is that right? But it could be considering all kinds of different asset classes, right? Or how would you correct that?

Pablo Gonzalez
I would say that the community strategy hits every part of the funnel. I would say that the top-of-funnel strategy is that let's open the umbrella. Let's talk about other asset classes. Let's make this a safe space and then talk about this. But where the community, you know, what we have found is the way that we measure the effectiveness of this thing is, you know, we run this podcast live every single week, and we measure how many people buy a rental property from them within 30 days of having attended one of these webinars, which we call it a show. Right. But it's a webinar, right? So today, 35% of new business comes from somebody that was on a webinar within 30 days. And what that tells me is that I don't really care if they became top of funnel because they got a ping of like webinar’s happening or they were listening to the podcast and that's what did it. What that allows me to do is just understand that in the buying process of investing a large amount of money with somebody, they're going to hold on forever. There is a checkmark for everybody, right? Like there is, like, is this interesting to me? Do I trust you? Is it for me? That ‘do I trust you’ checkmark is a big checkmark the check-off. And we know that when people are in a buying decision, attending a show is a major, major checkmark on trust. Because you get there, you know, you can go to a bunch of shows if you want, but like you get to one, and you realize that there's 90 other people that show up to these things and 60 of them show it to all of them, and they all have nicknames, and they're willing to talk to you about it. You're willing to get a third-party perspective, and we've got nothing to hide because we're showing up here live every single week. And you know that that is something that people are like, oh, okay, cool. Check. I can now lay my lay my bed on the pillow at night. Right. So it's like there is the top-of-funnel consideration. That's why we call it the not your average investor show. That's why we put out things like we'll comment on we call it not your average insights like Silicon Valley bike bank melts down and we'll be like Silicon Valley bank just melted down. What does this have to do with real estate? And we'll, you know, we'll talk about the Silicon Valley bank story. And at the end of the day, the moral of the story is always going to be like, what we do is the best way, right? But, you know, it basically is like, oh, this is what you get. You know, startups are risky, whereas like boring old rental properties are not. Right. Like if you have if you have the right partner, those are top-of-funnel shows. Then there's, you know, then there's a bunch of middle of the file, you know, then there's a bunch of bottom of the funnel stuff, to be quite honest, where we're just literally sitting there talking about like, why a vertically integrated, property management company that signs two and three-year leases instead of one-year leases is better for you because you really win through tenant occupancy. And we're, like, really evangelizing this idea that you want to align some with property management companies that like win when you win. And go ahead and find any of these other ones knowing that they're going to find one, maybe two others in the country. And like we're setting the buying standard for that. So now it's just like deep positions everybody else. Right. Like it. It hits on every part of the funnel. The magic of it is like, you know, how wide can cast the net at the top and how skillful you can be at driving the narrative from this wide net down like, a prices is right plinko board into like the right Plinko thing that you win the car with, you know? Yeah, I don't know. Did you watch Price Is Right?


Andrew Smallwood
Yes. I was imagining that occupied its way down...

Pablo Gonzalez
Right down to the car. Yeah. That's great.

Andrew Smallwood
I like what you said. It's got me thinking differently about, it's not just pulling in people top of funnel and educating at a very high level there that really there is content, community, engaging people wherever they are, inventory. And I'm sure there's even existing clients that are probably, oh yeah, a part of that. And oh yeah, maybe they're they're buying more. It's actually expanding post acquisition. Is that right?

Pablo Gonzalez
Yeah. So when we start evangelizing how good the market conditions are in Jacksonville to existing clients via the show that reactivates old clients. Right. So yes, there is also part of the content strategy that is like, you know, this is attractive to anybody that's like in a buying decision, but it's also attractive to like remind people, hey, you know, like you've put this money here before, it's still good over here on these waters. And there's all this other upside that's still left over. So yeah, absolutely. And quite frankly, those were the first things that we realized. Right. Like when we first started the show, the first thing that made us obvious that, like, this thing could work was that we were bringing on old clients I had invested in a while. And once they come over and they remember how awesome Greg is and how great the great team is, you know, they're like, you know what? Why are we doing more of this? Right? Like, so you know that the guests on the show as clients really was the thing that kind of like kickstarted the flywheel as far as measurement and knowing that this was something good to invest in, and it was only like six, eight months later where, like, the people that had been tuning in for three months were like, all right, I'm ready. And they started raising their hands and started doing it. So like it took a little while to get to the point where it became so attractive. But once it tips, it's like a snowball, boom.

Andrew Smallwood
Now, a couple of things I want to ask you, Pablo, to help make this in practice, I feel like there's good coverage here of hey, philosophically, here's a different approach to this, here’s clear business benefits and a shining example of this working really well, you know how you would measure success. Like a lot of good stuff we've covered. I'm just imagining I don't even have to imagine just me sitting here and thinking about, okay, well, like, that's great. If I've got a budget to hire someone as passionate and exciting as Pablo Gonzalez, to help me run this play. Right. And, you know, I've got the size and scale of a JWB, if somebody's looking at that today, you know, at 6000 units and everything else there, it could be easy if I'm just imagining if I were a property manager, maybe I'm in a place where, you know, I'm trying to decide, like, can I hire my next RTM or VA right now? And it's a tighter spot. It may feel like, can I, can I invest into something like this? Yeah. Yeah. That is going to take some patience and time. And here's where I'm at. Like what advice would you give that person if that's where they're where they're at?

Pablo Gonzalez
Yeah definitely. Man. Listen it's not just advice to give that person. It's advice I had to create for myself. Right. Like I'm the total bunch of people who are like, man, so do you, like, just do this for a bunch of people? And you'd be surprised at, you know, I guess there's this belief around you can be an entrepreneur and you can like, strikeout, strikeout, strikeout and then you hit a home run and it's on and I'm like, yeah, but what if you hit a home run the first time that you did this and you never learned to play baseball like that was me, right? Like it really all it really all worked out very well. And I'd be lying if I told you that the immediacy of the effect was not also super cooked by Covid, right? Like this idea that all of a sudden people looked for places to belong. And we were standing there with a bag. The idea that everybody was freaking out and we were having a press conference every single week was a big accelerator of this. Right? So in trying to reverse engineer how someone can really build up to this thing, what I found, this is the best way to, like, test this in a small scale is number one, you really got to get that point of view piece, right? Like you really got to get this, that, that thing of validating how your clients see you in their eyes, understanding what their world is, understanding what the problems are in there and how they manifest, understanding how you fit into that solution and how they live once you fix that with that part of it. Right. So doing a point of view, which I'm happy to kind of like share with the audience, we can leave it in the, in the, in the notes or whatever. I have like a point of view exercise that you can run yourself, that you can do.

Andrew Smallwood
Can you do maybe like, here's a 60-second version framework, a POV, your point of view of what are the pieces that are relevant?

Pablo Gonzalez
Yeah, I've said it a couple of times. Right. So it's the formula is new context creates a missing which will need an innovation to solve it. Now you have this like differentiating thing right, a category. A point of view is that put into a story. So it starts off with how the world is right. Hey we know that right now the average person in retirement age only has around like, $300,000 saved up and the median person has like $100,000. It's up. Right? Like it's or the other way around. Right. Like people are not getting to retirement the way that they want to get to retirement. Right. And the people that are behind feel like they can never catch up, because at the end of the day, where you're taught to invest in growth stocks for a certain amount of your life, and then as you start getting older, you start investing in like cash flow things, so you lose your growth potential, and you can only live off once the cash flow of the growth stuff that you're already invested. And by the time you retire, you can't risk that stuff, man, or else you're screwed. Right? And the way that that looks is, you know, if people get to a certain age, they're replacing less than 50% of their income. They're not able to retire. There are daunting statistics around this idea that that, that generations, you know, millennials, generation Z, boomers, like, they are losing faith in their ability to, to retire. And even worse, we're living to be 100 now. Right? So, like, you're going to have to live longer off of that money. But what if it didn't have to be that way, right. Like that. So so that's those. So that is the world is it is the problem with the world and how those problems feel. Right. And then and so that's the first part. And you got to nail that. Right. If people don't agree with that then they're not hooked. Right. Like if you don't get that right then there's room like well this isn't for me, okay. And you can go talk to somebody else. But if you get that part right and you can be like, well, it doesn't really have to be that way. What have you can invest in something that actually grows and grows in cash flow and continues to grow and grow in cash flow over time. And the older you are, the more options you have from it, and the more the more it grows. by itself. Right. That is what Rental Properties represents. So, you know, if you can find a way to help people invest in rental properties without having to become real estate experts and without having to be so hard on it being as easy as buying a bond or buying like a stock or whatever. Now we're cooking with fire, right? Like, and that's what JWB has built. Right? So that is that is the point of view right there. Like I got to get you hooked on this idea that you don't like your options for retirement right now. You feel behind, but you also don't want to be a real estate investor. If I can find some way to like do this then that, right? So that's that's the point of view piece, right? If you can nail that part. Right. Like if you can sit down and get that right, the next stage to do to see if like you have a good, you know, propensity for one of these like kind of like community and content strategies is now go interview your clients right. Like go talk to your 10-15 favorite clients and like walk them through this talk track. Just like asking them, asking them questions to see if they in their own words, you know how they phrase that in their time. I'll be like, man, you know, we're seeing this problem. Are you seeing this problem? Yeah. All right. Tell me how you see it. Right. Like have them have them say that stuff and record all that content and, you know, get it at every stage of the point of view. And if you can do that and it kind of matches what you're saying now you've got this like really rich content that you can use in the bottom of a funnel, in the middle of a funnel and in your advertising. Right. You can now make a little compilation point of view video. You can now make compilations of like the world as it is today. And you'd be like, yeah, we know this. That's why we built our company this way. And you can have all these different like validation points of like people agreeing that, like on the other side is this lifestyle, right. So then then you can chop that down further and have like hundreds, hundreds of pieces of social media content. Right? That to me is like the minimum viable product of doing this. That's the test. That's the MVP, right? Because if you do that, you're getting resonance. You make that video, you're able to distribute it. That starts giving you some positive feedback. You put that into your into your lead nurture sequences. You put that into your ads. You put that on your web pages, you're putting that on your social media, and you start getting people who really starting to resonate, particularly the fact that your clients are on it and you can tag them on it and they can be like, oh yeah, this is me talking about my life. You know, if that stuff works, then, you know, you have the foundation for really doing this thing and you don't have to go all in at once.

Andrew Smallwood
So just a recap, a couple of key steps that you laid out there. So one is developing this clear POV. Yeah. That has you know, whether it's a narrative or you got these elements right pieces to it. The second is okay, you can start to put those on your website and email that out to people, your existing clients. Right. Engaging them in that, you amplifying what they're doing to reach some other people. And if you start to see this, you should be able to start to see traction from that. Yeah. That gives you a little encouragement to keep going. Yep. And enough fuel to say, okay, now can we start to make other investments, whether it's a podcast or a Facebook group.

Pablo Gonzalez
Or going to events and running events that follow this thing? Right. I, I call, you know, the next up, the next investments is what I call experiential content marketing. Right. Like how do you how do you create events where are the people that are your biggest fans are there, and so are the people that are your prospects and they interact. Right. And how can you make those events more about the biggest, you know, creating content about the biggest fans and the moments from the new people that are there more so than created content around, like check out this sweet party we just had, or like just the keynotes that you're getting or whatever, right? So that that, you know, that allows you to continue to validate this. And how can you moderate conversations that are one part about the person you're talking to, and then how their life intersects with this point of view? So that way you can, you know, the conversation can always have a part of that point of view being a part of it. And then you continue to make content that way. And if you're getting really good at reverse engineering, showing off the people that come to the events and like what they believe that intersects with yours versus just the experts that com then that content actually drives more people to your events, whether it is an online event, like a internet talk show or a webinar, or whether it is right or which is which, is how, you know, you guys use this very effectively, right? Like your best clients are here. You make it obvious that your best clients are stars and all the other people that aren't your clients, that are like, yeah, I want to be a star too, right? You do it with these things and and everything that you're doing. Right. So it's like a, it's like a very similar methodology. And then creating content with them so that that can scale beyond just the room that it's in and throw up a bad signal of like, hey, you get to meet this kind of person, you get to have this kind of conversation at these events. That is what will drive people to show up and be part of the community.

Andrew Smallwood
And if I'm like a local business and it's let's say, hey, it's not NARPM for example, but, you know, there's local BNIs there. Yeah. You know, I think if you Pablo, it's like you're an excellent networker. And like I would say, you're a relationship-driven person. You're a you're a natural connector. And, you know, I'm curious if there's advice you would give to people. Hey, if you're thinking about building your network, be a connector. Yeah. What are some of the things an individual might do, Like I mean I can share my own experiences with you, but I'm just curious what you would offer up. It's like you're saying the things I've done that have been really effective.

Pablo Gonzalez
I mean, I've been in this conversation a lot in the last eight hours, right? Because this really was me for a long time. I like number one as a network, as you know, I can give networking tips all day long. I think that I think that what you're asking me is like, how do we take this new kind of approach of like experiential content marketing for yourself? Right? I've had a bunch of conversations with property managers today that have come up to me like, yeah, man. And like, this is me. That's that's what I believe in, in even in Jacksonville. But I believe this a little bit differently. Right. Like or I am talking to people that want to self-manage. So what I would do is be showing up at these local real estate events that and talking to people that self-manage. And I'd be asking them about like their experiences and I'd be like, man, what's the biggest mistake you ever made? You know, like, what was the moment that you wish that you were going to quit real estate and you almost didn't have, like, what is the most angry your husband's been at you because you had to go do something in the middle of special time, right? And then having those conversations with your cell phone out and a selfie stick. And just like recording that stuff and be like, man, that's really cool. Yeah. You know, he had this moment that is the value of like having a good partner or not having a good partner, right? Like just if you can get into these like networking conversations, if you can create your own point of view, right, of like what you believe in and why things work and you can get in the conversations with people based on the point of view, not based on what you do the based on like the problem that you see out there and see how they resonate with it and how they respond to it and how they've solved it. And, you know, be like, if you're getting a good one, be like, oh, that's really great. Can we all record this real quick? I'm on my cell phone and just be like, man, you just said this. Tell me that story again. And then when they finish to be like, yeah, man, that's exactly what I was thinking. Because, you know, the world is like this and and that and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. You know, that stuff is actually surprisingly effective content for Facebook and LinkedIn when you're like tagging others and be like, met, this guy has a great experience. This is what he said or she said, that's really the minimum viable product. I've been doing that since like 2017. you know, and then I only realized in like when Greg said, yeah, man, buddy, let's go. That's when I built an operation around it because I, I promised him something. I didn't know how to deliver it from like a, from, like a operational standpoint. But that idea of just like showing up with your selfie stick and maybe a couple of lobs if, if you want to spend 80 bucks, it's not a big deal. And, you know, highlighting others while you're networking and, you know, like testing out that point of view to see if you resonate, let's get in the conversation about it and record it, start distributing that kind of stuff purposefully, going to places where the people that you do business with is there so they can be part of that conversation. Right? Like I think that's, that's pretty low hanging fruit for people.

Andrew Smallwood
All right. So, Pablo, with the time we have left. Yeah. What's something we haven't talked about yet, but that you would feel would be the most valuable thing? Yeah. Share with the audience.

Pablo Gonzalez
You know, I was I was shocked when I started having this conversation with Greg about, you know, kind of like how they share their value prop and pitching. The city itself, is something that hadn't crossed his mind. I thought everybody would be on that stuff. Right. So like, I think I think as a property manager, you know, you can go out and compete with everybody as much as you want. But if you're not familiar with why it makes sense to invest in your city, then you're missing the boat in, like how you expand the tent of people that are interested, right? Like showing up in a room and talking about, oh man, this is how I run a property management company is way less interesting than showing up in a room and be like, did you know that when 10,000 residents reach a downtown, it hits a tipping point? And now the downtown starts to become go from 8 hour to 16 hour? And when a downtown goes from 8 hour to 16 hour, properties around the downtown starts to increase. Well guess what Jacksonville. They're going through that right now. Did you know that right. So you know that that's going to the host of Biggerpockets this year. Right. He's going to be way more interested in talking about that than me talking about JWB. Right. Or even in Jacksonville itself. People that are from there don't realize how good of a real estate investing market it is. So like walking into a room and having that conversation gets people to like raise an eyebrow and be like, oh really? Tell me more about this. And that's going to, you know, that's going to feed the whole, like, oh, I went from uninterested in real estate to interested in real estate, or I went from interested to real estate to interested in real estate in Jacksonville, or interested in real estate in Jacksonville, but not for me. So I got to get in this dog, you know, so, you know, like, I think I think getting like real familiar on what the economic drivers are in your city and how to promote that. And then, you know, if you get really good at that, how you get involved to that and actually like become part of the solution and become part of the economic development. And I think that that is something that if I was a property manager, I'd get real serious about,

Andrew Smallwood
Being known for, yeah. Like what I'm taking away from that is there's this choice consumers have to make of, am I going to choose this brand or this company right to work with? It's different choice to say, am I going to work with a professional property management firm or manage myself? It's a different question. Say am I like it opens up the Tam, the addressable market. Yeah. Of not just here's who's already currently invested in the city. Who's going to make a choice to continue to invest in the city or choose for the first time, right, to invest in the city? And here's here's why. Right. And having that discussion of your greatest biases. Because of the street. But you're investing into, a market. Here's the dynamics that are going to drive property values over a long enough, you know, full market cycle. Yep.

Pablo Gonzalez
Yeah. Open the aperture, man. Open the aperture. You know, like. Yeah.

Andrew Smallwood
Cool, yeah. Pablo, thanks for sharing. Always a pleasure, man.

Pablo Gonzalez
Pleasure's mine, my friend.

 

Laura Mac & Carol Housel

And that wraps up another episode of the Triple-Win Property Management podcast. Thank you for pressing play. We hope you've gained valuable insights and inspiration.

The Triple-Win Property Management Podcast is proudly produced and distributed by Second Nature, where we believe in a Triple-Win, building winning experiences for your residents, investors and your teams with the only fully managed resident benefits package. Visit SecondNature.com to learn more and talk to an RBP expert in your area. If you have any questions or comments or want to weigh in on the conversation, we'd love to hear from you. Email TripleWin@SecondNature.com. That's TripleWin@SecondNature.com. Stay connected with us beyond the podcast. Visit our website at SecondNature.com to stay updated with upcoming property management events and articles. And don't forget, you can keep the conversation going in the Triple-Win Property Management Facebook group. It's exclusively for property managers. To receive even more valuable insights and updates, subscribe to our newsletter. You can find the link to that and much more in the show notes. On behalf of the Triple-Win community, this is Laura Mac, thanking you for tuning in. And on behalf of Second Nature, this is Carol Housel. Check back soon for another exciting episode. Until then, keep striving for that Triple-Win.

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